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A photo of a small blocky statuette of a seated man carved from rough stone

A votive statue of Chai-Hapi (a thousand of bread, a thousand of beer, a thousand of all good things to him!) excavated from the remains of Roman Vienna. Carved from gneis. In the style of late 19th Dynasty Heliopolis. Wien, Kunsthistorisches Musem, Ägyptische-Orientalische Sammlung, Inv. Nr. Äs 64. Photographed on special exhibition at Schloss Ambras by Sean Manning.

When Tutankhamun’s tomb was opened, the excavators found a copper trumpet and a silver trumpet. The British looked at them and thought a bit and decided that the obvious thing to do was to play them for the BBC. The recording is now available on YouTube (c/o Bronze Age Centre)

“More Progress Made toward Learning Contents of Herculaneum Scrolls”

The late Frederick Pohl reviews L. Sprague de Camp’s novel set in Gothic Italy Lest Darkness Fall

“Piece by Piece, Monks Scrabble to Preserve Iraq’s Christian History”

A proposal that Akkadian medical texts describe post-traumatic stress disorder has been making the rounds on the Internet (Abdul-Hamid and Hughes, ‘Nothing New Under the Sun: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders in the Ancient World’). Several other scholars, such as Darin Hayton, Owen Rees, and vaughanbell have written critical responses.

Osama S. M. Amin and one “Mr. Rizgar” have posted some photos of an Akkadian rock relief and inscription on the Belula Pass in eastern Iraqi Kurdistan (link)

Steve Muhlberger reviews a translation of a fifteenth century novel about adulthood and court life. Phil Paine comments on an earlier French edition (link).

Andreea Dee enjoyed the Real Fighting Stuff conference in Glasgow on European weapons and martial arts last March (link).

This post is a bit of a stir-fry, so I thought I should end with something on food. Christian Eckert was the martial arts and training expert for a project to reconstruct the training and diet of Roman gladiators at a German university. He has published part of his work in a book, Gladiatoren Kochbuch (Neumann-Neudamm Melsungen, 2014). I noticed a copy on our library shelves, but my readers might have to try Bookfinder or the Warrior Woman of the Internet.